35 Tips for getting started with social media

If you are going to start using social media, you should at least have an understanding of what it’s about. Social media is not about the tools, the tools are only a facilitator.

Starting with the basics. Roll your sleeves up, get dirty and stake your claim:

1) Register your domain name, preferably a dot com extension. It’s also a good idea to register any variations and extensions of your domain name. Do it sooner rather than later, or you might be negotiating with a domain squatter, paying a premium in the future, rather than pennies in the present.

2) Find a good, reliable web host, and do your homework. Ask for referrals. If you are just starting out, it’s okay and economical to go with the cheap shared hosting plan, I.E Godaddy. Expect to upgrade to a mid level or higher hosting package within 90 days or less.

3) Install a blogging platform, preferably WordPress. Find and install the necessary plugins, themes and widgets. Installing a caching-system plugin is also a good idea. You need to optimize not only just for search engines, but also page loading time. Find a simple theme and build around it. KISS is always a good rule of thumb.

4) Customize  your permalink structure immediately. By default, WordPress uses web URLs which have question marks and lots of numbers in them. This will severely limit the amount of traffic you will see from search engines. Change your permalink formatting to the following markup: (day and name) yourblog.com/blog/2008/10/25/sample-post/

5) Create an about page. Tell people what your blog is about, and most importantly what you’re about. Put a nice head shot of yourself on the about or profile page. Make sure to include any awards or recognition that may be relevant about the author.  Give people an email address to email you, rather than an online form. Add your primary social networking badges and urls on your contact page. Facebook, Linkedin and Twitter should be a starting point. I would also create a blogroll. It can be on your sidebar, or a separate page, but it should exist somewhere on your blog.

6) Install analytic software, such as Google Analytics. It’s a good idea to have at least two stats packages installed and running. All analytic software is not created equal, they all have the same purpose, but vary in their reporting and tracking methods. Results will vary to an extent, comparison of multiple data sources is vital.

7) Give people the tools to promote your content.  Social promotional buttons make it easy for your visitors to Digg, StumbleUpon, and share your content. Bring the good word back to your blog. For instance, if you’re active on FriendFeed you should install the FriendFeed comments and likes plugin on your blog.

8 ) Establish a Feedburner account. Provide easy visibility for new RSS subscribers, use text links in addition to graphics to promote your RSS feed  You can also add an email subscription form on your site. People who do not use feed readers, will be emailed your latest postings.

9) Focus and be consistent with your blogging. Most professional bloggers get paid per post. Don’t be intimidated or feel forced to compete with them. Work at your own pace. Quality takes time, plain and simple.

10) Build as many social passports as possible. Passports are basically the profiles that you build on the various social platforms. These profiles all should be consistent, and most importantly point back to your blog or website. The goal is to create as much organic link juice as possible.  The core target is search engines. Consistently update these profiles, and use tools such as ping.fm to update them.

11) Leave thoughtful and constructive comments as much as possible on other blogs. Don’t stop there, post comments on Facebook walls, FriendFeed, and Twitter. This promotes good practices in social media, and it also gives you an opportunity for exposure and link placement. This can lead into  new networking opportunities and potential new friendships.

12) Establish and actively use your Google Reader account. This perhaps is the most powerful tool in any social media arsenal besides a blog or microblogging platform, such as Twitter. I will outline more in detail as we get further down the list.

13) Find the top 50 blogs in your space, and subscribe to their RSS feeds in Google Reader. Consistently be on the lookout for new blogs, and the voices behind them.

14) At this point you should already have a Twitter account. If not, establish one.  If your objective is personal branding, your Twitter username should be your name. Otherwise you could brand your twitter username the same name as your blog. Remember consistency with all your profiles is key.

15) Work smarter not harder. Use the tools to help you manage and stay ahead of the pack.

16) Listen to what’s being said about you.  Create Google alerts to monitor for positive or negative chatter.

17) Link out as often as possible when the circumstances permit it. If you are writing a post on a related subject, always look for a chance to reference a fellow bloggers work. This is not only good blogging etiquette, but will also put you on that persons radar in a positive way.

18) Build relationships with key influencers in all the communities and platforms that you participate on. Relationships take time to develop and grow in time.  One good example on how to do this, is listed above at #17.

19) The material that you create should be something that people want to share. For the most part, it should be relevant to your networks’ interests. Create newsworthy, thoughtful, intelligent content that has immediate usefulness.

20) Become an expert in your field.  Try to align and surround yourself with the best tools, and people to accomplish this. It’s all about networking, networking and networking. Take it offline when permitting. Organize local social media meetups and tweetups. Make it an effort to attend trade shows when possible.

21) Don’t knock it until you tried it at least once.  Be open to trying new multimedia applications that enable self promotion, audience engagement, brand retention and participation. Experiment with podcasting, creating video, slide shows, or creating and posting any type of original user generated content.

22) Solicit not only your peers for feedback, but your audience. Ask your readers to submit feedback for site improvements, ideas on new topics to blog about, follow ups on previous topics, participation in polls etc.

23) Good content speaks for itself, and is recognized. Let others promote your content and only promote your best stuff.  Ask your twitter followers to spread the word by re-tweeting good posts. Be sure to do the same for others.

24) Promote others, even more than you promote yourself. Practice this, and it will come back to you tenfold.

25) Use Google Reader to share and promote your own work, as well as your  core networks content. Don’t limit yourself, share complete strangers work too. Good content needs to be rewarded, recognized and distributed through the appropriate channels and relevant communities.

26) Hopefully you will already have at least one active social bookmarking account established.  Delicious, Diigo, Ma.gnolia, any of these will do. Open accounts on all three of these services.  Make Diigo your primary account for bookmarking. By doing this, you can use a Diigo feature that allows you to bookmark to all three services simultaneously.

27) Establish accounts on Stumbleupon, and any social news sites such as Digg, Reddit and Mixx.

28) In addition to sharing content with Google Reader, be sure to StumbleUpon, good blogs, or websites.  StumbleUpon is key for traffic and exposure.  You can expect a large spike in traffic initially, then gradually it tapers off within a few days. You can expect long term traffic from SU, albeit in dribs and drabs.

29) Tag your media, especially blog posts and bookmarks.  Social bookmarking, video and image sharing sites also serve as search engines, therefore tag accordingly. The traffic comes in dribs and drabs, but it’s targeted traffic nonetheless. Every click counts. Same applies to any other forms of media you create, including videos you publish on Youtube, Vimeo. Images you publish on Flickr, podcasts, etc.

30) Blog postings, bookmarks, Flickr images and so forth should all be imported into a social content aggregation site, such as FriendFeed.com

31) Be omnipresent on all the networks. I should be able to find out about your latest happenings, and or statuses if I am browsing your Facebook profile, Linked profile, Twitter or FriendFeed stream.

32) Use the cloud to your benefit. Work more efficiently by using online applications to manage and organize the workload.

33) Take full advantage of all the Google services that are offered. Google Calendar, Google Docs, Google Notebook, Google Reader and so forth. These services are all web based, and offer sharing and group collaborating features.  You can also import the data publicly via RSS, and an html page via your Google Reader shared link blog. Bottom line is, most of your Google data is easily accessible, manageable and integrateable with the web.

34) It can take months even years to see successes.  Stay consistent and focused with your social media strategy. Adapt when necessary, and do not be afraid to take calculated risks.

35) Do not ignore the simple concept of “transparency.” Personalize your brand. People relate to people much more effectively than they can a logo or commoditized brand.

Any additional thoughts?

Image by mr.beaver under Creative Commons license.


-- Download 35 Tips for getting started with social media as PDF --


  • http://broadcasting-brain.com Mark Dykeman

    Impressive. Very impressive.

    About 4 – there are different schools of thought about defining your permalink structure. Some people are strongly opposed to incorporating date characters into the URL, as it firmly fixes your posts at a certain point in time, which may turn some people off if they encounter them at some point in the future. Adding the word “blog” is interesting and something I've never considered before: is that in anticipation of a more function-filled website of which the blog is a part?

    Great work!

  • http://thoughtwrestling.com/blog Mark Dykeman

    Impressive. Very impressive.

    About 4 – there are different schools of thought about defining your permalink structure. Some people are strongly opposed to incorporating date characters into the URL, as it firmly fixes your posts at a certain point in time, which may turn some people off if they encounter them at some point in the future. Adding the word “blog” is interesting and something I’ve never considered before: is that in anticipation of a more function-filled website of which the blog is a part?

    Great work!

    • http://mikefruchter.me Mike Fruchter

      Mark, thank you!

      You have a very valid point regarding the permalink structure. It’s a tough call, but a majority of the blogs, including you an I, all use the date in the permalink. I think it’s almost become a standard at this point. It does firmly affix your post to a certain point in time as you mentioned, but from a search engine perspective I wonder how much it weighs or is factored in the serps, and or algorithms. If the date does not throw them off in serps, it will once the they hit blog from the time stamp or comments :)

      I think adding the word blog is more beneficial for search engines. If the site is just a blog, a majority of the searches for it will contain blog in the keywords, i.e Broadcasting Brain Blog, Mark Dykeman+ Blog. Definitely having the keyword blog in the url helps, but how much is a good question. As we both know people will find our sites/blogs regardless of the fact. I think it cant hurt, and to some extent might spark anticipation to explore other areas on the site.

    • http://mikefruchter.me Mike Fruchter

      I have never experimented with a custom permalink structure. I’m curious to see how better these blogs do in the serps, compared to day and name/time permalinks. I know centernetworks.com uses this structure. I don’t want change my blog permalink structure to find out. It probably would cause all sorts of 404 havoc. It would be a good experiment though.

      • http://www.kimwoodbridge.com Kim Woodbridge

        After reading this article today I did some research on permalink structure but did not come up with a definitive answer. I do use yoast.com for a lot of my WordPress information and in one of his SEO articles he recommended only using the post name. But I am not clear as to why it would be better – I should probably ask him. There is a plugin you can use if you do decide to change your permalink structure – I installed it when I changed mine and didn’t have a single problem. This is the plugin http://urbangiraffe.com/plugins/redirection/ and if you are interested in the yoast article it is http://yoast.com/articles/wordpress-seo/

  • http://www.sharingatwork.com Daniel J. Pritchett

    Excellent work, Mike! This is a great resource for anyone working in social media, from neophytes to old hands.

  • http://www.sharingatwork.com Daniel J. Pritchett

    Excellent work, Mike! This is a great resource for anyone working in social media, from neophytes to old hands.

  • http://maheshcr.com/blog maheshcr

    Excellent, really thorough post…thanks a ton.

    I would mention one point in addition – Be clear about your goals from this venture and about your motivations. When starting out its easy to be very confused on why one is spending all this effort. Some possibilities here, blog for i)pleasure ii) knowledge sharing iii)personal branding iv) exploration. Of course this is not a black or white categorization and multiple overlaps is the norm.

    Regardless of what combination it is, the outcome has to be measured. If you started out wanting to do this for pleasure, ask yourself if you are having fun or just plodding through because its the latest fad. Basically, consider your ROI very seriously. Without it you might not even realize a course correction is needed and head out way out of track from your original goal.

    This has been implicitly covered in your points but thought it would be good to be a little explicit for someone starting out.

    Thanks again for sharing!

  • http://maheshcr.com/blog maheshcr

    Excellent, really thorough post…thanks a ton.

    I would mention one point in addition – Be clear about your goals from this venture and about your motivations. When starting out its easy to be very confused on why one is spending all this effort. Some possibilities here, blog for i)pleasure ii) knowledge sharing iii)personal branding iv) exploration. Of course this is not a black or white categorization and multiple overlaps is the norm.

    Regardless of what combination it is, the outcome has to be measured. If you started out wanting to do this for pleasure, ask yourself if you are having fun or just plodding through because its the latest fad. Basically, consider your ROI very seriously. Without it you might not even realize a course correction is needed and head out way out of track from your original goal.

    This has been implicitly covered in your points but thought it would be good to be a little explicit for someone starting out.

    Thanks again for sharing!

  • http://broadcasting-brain.com Mark Dykeman

    Impressive. Very impressive.

    About 4 – there are different schools of thought about defining your permalink structure. Some people are strongly opposed to incorporating date characters into the URL, as it firmly fixes your posts at a certain point in time, which may turn some people off if they encounter them at some point in the future. Adding the word “blog” is interesting and something I've never considered before: is that in anticipation of a more function-filled website of which the blog is a part?

    Great work!

  • http://www.sharingatwork.com Daniel J. Pritchett

    Excellent work, Mike! This is a great resource for anyone working in social media, from neophytes to old hands.

  • http://www.vizedu.com Sandeep Arora

    Nice. Pretty thorough .

    We have created a Flash Animation on “What is Social Media” and “Social Media Casestudy: CommonCraft”.
    I thought you might be interested.

  • http://www.vizedu.com Sandeep Arora

    Sorry – Forgot to mention URLs of Flash Animation

    http://vizedu.com/2008/10/social-media-explaine
    http://vizedu.com/2008/10/social-media-casestud

    Thanks

  • http://www.dariosalvelli.com Dario Salvelli

    Thanks for this post is an excellent summary.

  • http://maheshcr.com/blog maheshcr

    Excellent, really thorough post…thanks a ton.

    I would mention one point in addition – Be clear about your goals from this venture and about your motivations. When starting out its easy to be very confused on why one is spending all this effort. Some possibilities here, blog for i)pleasure ii) knowledge sharing iii)personal branding iv) exploration. Of course this is not a black or white categorization and multiple overlaps is the norm.

    Regardless of what combination it is, the outcome has to be measured. If you started out wanting to do this for pleasure, ask yourself if you are having fun or just plodding through because its the latest fad. Basically, consider your ROI very seriously. Without it you might not even realize a course correction is needed and head out way out of track from your original goal.

    This has been implicitly covered in your points but thought it would be good to be a little explicit for someone starting out.

    Thanks again for sharing!

  • http://www.vizedu.com Sandeep Arora

    Nice. Pretty thorough .

    We have created a Flash Animation on “What is Social Media” and “Social Media Casestudy: CommonCraft”.
    I thought you might be interested.

  • http://www.vizedu.com Sandeep Arora
    • http://mikefruchter.me Mike Fruchter

      Sandeep, thank you. I really like the flash presentations. I would like to share it on my blog. Is there a flash embed you can provide me?

      • http://www.vizedu.com Sandeep Arora

        Hi Michael,
        Thanks very much for the above note. Here is the Flash embed for “Social Media” flash.

        Let me know how it goes.
        Thanks

  • http://www.dariosalvelli.com Dario Salvelli

    Thanks for this post is an excellent summary.

  • http://www.vizedu.com Sandeep Arora

    Nice. Pretty thorough .

    We have created a Flash Animation on “What is Social Media” and “Social Media Casestudy: CommonCraft”.
    I thought you might be interested.

  • http://www.vizedu.com Sandeep Arora

    Sorry – Forgot to mention URLs of Flash Animation

    http://vizedu.com/2008/10/social-media-explaine
    http://vizedu.com/2008/10/social-media-casestud

    Thanks

  • http://www.dariosalvelli.com Dario Salvelli

    Thanks for this post is an excellent summary.

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  • http://www.kimwoodbridge.com Kim Woodbridge

    Mike – Wow! You've covered it all. It actually seems exhausting to me :-)

    I agree with Mark that there are differing views on permalinks. I actually prefer to remove the date from mine and use only the post title.

    And I was really happy to see your mention of diigo. While I still prefer delicious, diigo does allow you to bookmark to all three sites like you mentioned. When I first started doing that it was more for bookmark insurance – if one site disappeared my bookmarks would still exist somewhere else. Only later did I think of the social aspect of it.

    I am, however, often hesitant to share my own stuff. You suggested sharing your own content in Google reader. Is that really an acceptable practice?

    On a side note, I am slowly trying to spend more time with friendfeed :-)

  • http://www.squashyfrog.com/ Kol Tregaskes

    Excellent article. I do prefer it (where possible) that bullet-point ae used to brng he point over concisely. Thank you, Michael.

  • http://www.kimwoodbridge.com Kim Woodbridge

    Mike – Wow! You’ve covered it all. It actually seems exhausting to me :-)

    I agree with Mark that there are differing views on permalinks. I actually prefer to remove the date from mine and use only the post title.

    And I was really happy to see your mention of diigo. While I still prefer delicious, diigo does allow you to bookmark to all three sites like you mentioned. When I first started doing that it was more for bookmark insurance – if one site disappeared my bookmarks would still exist somewhere else. Only later did I think of the social aspect of it.

    I am, however, often hesitant to share my own stuff. You suggested sharing your own content in Google reader. Is that really an acceptable practice?

    On a side note, I am slowly trying to spend more time with friendfeed :-)

    • http://mikefruchter.me Mike Fruchter

      Kim,

      Thank you. I’m glad to see more people using Diigo. It’s really such an under valued tool. It has so many social aspects and features, that people tend to get intimidated and never use it to it’s full potential. I think you should absolutely share you own content, when it’s your best quality stuff. I do mention often, not to share and promote your own content. This is because others will do it for you. Often when people are starting out they lack a big enough network for exposure. Under those circumstances share your best stuff, until you build up a network and platform for exposure. On a side note, I need to get you more active on FriendFeed :-)

    • http://mikefruchter.me Mike Fruchter

      Kim, I honestly did not give much of look at posterous. I think perhaps I will do a follow up post, and include some newer services. I was trying to keep the list focused on more Twitter like applications. Tumblr was the odd man out :)

  • http://www.squashyfrog.com/ Kol Tregaskes

    Excellent article. I do prefer it (where possible) that bullet-point ae used to brng he point over concisely. Thank you, Michael.

    • http://mikefruchter.me Mike Fruchter

      Kol, thanks for the comment and stopping by.

      • http://www.squashyfrog.com/ Kol Tregaskes

        No worries.

  • http://michaelfruchter.com/blog mfruchter

    Mark, thank you!

    You have a very valid point regarding the permalink structure. It's a tough call, but a majority of the blogs, including you an I, all use the date in the permalink. I think it's almost become a standard at this point. It does firmly affix your post to a certain point in time as you mentioned, but from a search engine perspective I wonder how much it weighs or is factored in the serps, and or algorithms. If the date does not throw them off in serps, it will once the they hit blog from the time stamp or comments :)

    I think adding the word blog is more beneficial for search engines. If the site is just a blog, a majority of the searches for it will contain blog in the keywords, i.e Broadcasting Brain Blog, Mark Dykeman+ Blog. Definitely having the keyword blog in the url helps, but how much is a good question. As we both know people will find our sites/blogs regardless of the fact. I think it cant hurt, and to some extent might spark anticipation to explore other areas on the site.

  • http://www.kimwoodbridge.com Kim Woodbridge

    Mike – Wow! You've covered it all. It actually seems exhausting to me :-)

    I agree with Mark that there are differing views on permalinks. I actually prefer to remove the date from mine and use only the post title.

    And I was really happy to see your mention of diigo. While I still prefer delicious, diigo does allow you to bookmark to all three sites like you mentioned. When I first started doing that it was more for bookmark insurance – if one site disappeared my bookmarks would still exist somewhere else. Only later did I think of the social aspect of it.

    I am, however, often hesitant to share my own stuff. You suggested sharing your own content in Google reader. Is that really an acceptable practice?

    On a side note, I am slowly trying to spend more time with friendfeed :-)

  • http://michaelfruchter.com/blog mfruchter

    I have never experimented with a custom permalink structure. I'm curious to see how better these blogs do in the serps, compared to day and name/time permalinks. I know centernetworks.com uses this structure. I don't want change my blog permalink structure to find out. It probably would cause all sorts of 404 havoc. It would be a good experiment though.

  • http://michaelfruchter.com/blog mfruchter

    Sandeep, thank you. I really like the flash presentations. I would like to share it on my blog. Is there a flash embed you can provide me?

  • http://michaelfruchter.com/blog mfruchter

    Kim,

    Thank you. I'm glad to see more people using Diigo. It's really such an under valued tool. It has so many social aspects and features, that people tend to get intimidated and never use it to it's full potential. I think you should absolutely share you own content, when it's your best quality stuff. I do mention often, not to share and promote your own content. This is because others will do it for you. Often when people are starting out they lack a big enough network for exposure. Under those circumstances share your best stuff, until you build up a network and platform for exposure. On a side note, I need to get you more active on FriendFeed :-)

  • http://michaelfruchter.com/blog mfruchter

    Kol, thanks for the comment and stopping by.

  • http://michaelfruchter.com/blog mfruchter

    Kim, I honestly did not give much of look at posterous. I think perhaps I will do a follow up post, and include some newer services. I was trying to keep the list focused on more Twitter like applications. Tumblr was the odd man out :)

  • http://www.squashyfrog.com/ Kol Tregaskes

    Excellent article. I do prefer it (where possible) that bullet-point ae used to brng he point over concisely. Thank you, Michael.

  • http://www.kimwoodbridge.com Kim Woodbridge

    After reading this article today I did some research on permalink structure but did not come up with a definitive answer. I do use yoast.com for a lot of my WordPress information and in one of his SEO articles he recommended only using the post name. But I am not clear as to why it would be better – I should probably ask him. There is a plugin you can use if you do decide to change your permalink structure – I installed it when I changed mine and didn't have a single problem. This is the plugin http://urbangiraffe.com/plugins/redirection/ and if you are interested in the yoast article it is http://yoast.com/articles/wordpress-seo/

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  • http://michaelfruchter.com/blog mfruchter

    Mark, thank you!

    You have a very valid point regarding the permalink structure. It's a tough call, but a majority of the blogs, including you an I, all use the date/time in the permalink. I think it's almost become a standard at this point. It does firmly affix your post to a certain point in time as you mentioned, but from a search engine perspective I wonder how much it weighs or is factored in the serps, and or algorithms. If the date does not throw them off in serps, it will once the they hit blog from the time stamp or comments :)

    I think adding the word blog is more beneficial for search engines. If the site is just a blog, a majority of the searches for it will contain blog in the keywords, i.e Broadcasting Brain Blog, Mark Dykeman+ Blog. Definitely having the keyword blog in the url helps, but how much is a good question. As we both know people will find our sites/blogs regardless of the fact. I think it cant hurt, and to some extent might spark anticipation to explore other areas on the site.

  • http://michaelfruchter.com/blog mfruchter

    I have never experimented with a custom permalink structure. I'm curious to see how better these blogs do in the serps, compared to day and name/time permalinks. I know centernetworks.com uses this structure. I don't want change my blog permalink structure, to find out. It probably would cause all sorts of 404 havoc. It would be a good experiment though.

  • http://michaelfruchter.com/blog mfruchter

    Sandeep, thank you. I really like the flash presentations. I would like to share it on my blog. Is there a flash embed you can provide me?

  • http://michaelfruchter.com/blog mfruchter

    Kim,

    Thank you. I'm glad to see more people using Diigo. It's really such an under valued tool. It has so many social aspects and features, that people tend to get intimidated and never use it to it's full potential. I think you should absolutely share you own content, when it's your best quality stuff. I do mention often, not to share and promote your own content. This is because others will do it for you. Often when people are starting out they lack a big enough network for exposure. Under those circumstances share your best stuff, until you build up a network and platform for exposure. On a side note, I need to get you more active on FriendFeed :-)

  • http://michaelfruchter.com/blog mfruchter

    Kol, thanks for the comment and stopping by.

  • http://michaelfruchter.com/blog mfruchter

    Kim, I honestly did not give much of look at posterous. I think perhaps I will do a follow up post, and include some newer services. I was trying to keep the list focused on more Twitter like applications. Tumblr was the odd man out :)

  • http://www.kimwoodbridge.com Kim Woodbridge

    After reading this article today I did some research on permalink structure but did not come up with a definitive answer. I do use yoast.com for a lot of my WordPress information and in one of his SEO articles he recommended only using the post name. But I am not clear as to why it would be better – I should probably ask him. There is a plugin you can use if you do decide to change your permalink structure – I installed it when I changed mine and didn't have a single problem. This is the plugin http://urbangiraffe.com/plugins/redirection/ and if you are interested in the yoast article it is http://yoast.com/articles/wordpress-seo/

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  • http://www.aadjemonkeyrock.com Aad 't Hart

    Very nice and impressive list of suggestions.. especially the last to suggestions that it takes time and patience…

    well done!

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  • http://www.squashyfrog.com/ Kol Tregaskes

    No worries.

  • http://www.aadjemonkeyrock.com Aad ‘t Hart

    Very nice and impressive list of suggestions.. especially the last to suggestions that it takes time and patience…

    well done!

  • http://www.aadjemonkeyrock.com Aad 't Hart

    Very nice and impressive list of suggestions.. especially the last to suggestions that it takes time and patience…

    well done!

  • http://www.squashyfrog.com/ Kol Tregaskes

    No worries.

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  • Sean

    Hi Mike. Nice blog. Widgets are becoming a staple in the smart social media.There is another way to increase traffic to site using Tell a friend widget.It’s completly free widget which allows content sharing without forcing visitors to leave your site.it can be downloaded at for free at http://tellafriend.socialtwist.com/index.jsp . Thought you’d have something to say about it too.

  • Sean

    Hi Mike. Nice blog. Widgets are becoming a staple in the smart social media.There is another way to increase traffic to site using Tell a friend widget.It’s completly free widget which allows content sharing without forcing visitors to leave your site.it can be downloaded at for free at http://tellafriend.socialtwist.com/index.jsp . Thought you’d have something to say about it too.